Student Seminar – Spring 2021

Schedule for Spring 2021

The Student Seminar has migrated to Zoom for the Spring 2021 semester.

Seminars are on Wednesdays
Time: 12:00 – 1:00pm

Contacts: Diane Lu, Leon Fernandes

Information for speakers: For information about schedule, direction, equipment, reimbursement and hotel, please click here.

 
 
1/13/2021

Andrew Gelman (Columbia)

“Bayesian Workflow”

Paper: http://www.stat.columbia.edu/~gelman/research/unpublished/Bayesian_Workflow_article.pdf

Zoom link: https://columbiauniversity.zoom.us/j/99319319176?pwd=Sjk5Ui82SFF4enpQVHZQRUtWNnM5Zz09

1/20/21

Johannes Wiesel (Columbia)

“Continuity of the martingale optimal transport problem on the real line”
 
Abstract: 
We show continuity of the martingale optimal transport optimization problem as a functional of its marginals. This is achieved via an estimate on the projection in the nested/causal Wasserstein distance of an arbitrary coupling on to the set of martingale couplings with the same marginals. As a corollary, we obtain an independent proof of sufficiency of the monotonicity principle established in [Beiglboeck, M., & Juillet, N. (2016). On a problem of optimal transport under marginal martingale constraints. Ann. Probab., 44 (2016), no. 1, 42106] for cost functions of polynomial growth.
 
 
1/27/21

Jingchen Liu (Columbia) 

“Process Data Analysis in Computer-based Assessment”
 
Abstract: 
In classic tests, item responses are often expressed as univariate categorical variables. Computer-based tests allow us to track students’ entire problem solving processes through log files. In this case, the response to each item is a time-stamped process containing students’ detailed behaviors and their interaction with the simulated environment. The key questions are whether and how much more information are contained in the detailed response processes additional to the traditional responses (yes/no or partial credits). Furthermore, we also need to develop methods to systematically extract such information from the process responses that often contain a substantial amount of noise. In this talk, I present several exploratory analyses of process data.
 

 

2/3/21

 
2/10/21
 
 
2/17/21  
2/24/21

 

 

3/3/21
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3/10/21

 

3/17/21

 

 

3/24/21
 
3/31/21

 

4/7/21

 

4/14/21
 
 
 
4/21/21
 
4/28/21